The Polish President and the HRH Grand Duke of Luxembourg exchanged letters to commemorate the anniversary in which they have highlighted cooperation and future exchange importance.

The two states formally established relations on 18 April 1921. Today, Luxembourg is the third-largest direct investor in Poland, with more than €24bn invested in 2019, while commercial exchange exceeded €750m. Nearly 5,000 Polish nationals live in Luxembourg today.

Marking the event, Polish President Andrzej Duda wrote in a letter to the Grand Duke that he is delighted that relations between the two countries "are based on genuine partnership and friendship," continuing to say the he hopes "that we will continue to develop them as effectively and in all dimensions, especially at the political, economic, and cultural level and in people-to-people contacts."

Press release from the Polish Embassy

To mark the occasion, the Polish Embassy in Luxembourg is today launching an anniversary campaign to commemorate the many links the two countries have established over the years and showcase the ties Poles and Luxembourgers have developed.

“The project is a celebration of how important Poles have become in the multi-cultural Luxembourg society,” Piotr Wojtczak, the Ambassador of Poland said. “It also shows little known ties some Luxembourgers have developed with our country,” he said.

The many inspiring stories from Poles in the Grand Duchy and Luxembourgers with links to Poland will now be shared with the public in a 8-minute spot and on a dedicated website polonais.lu.

“We worked for over a year to gather all the fascinating stories and have discovered some fascinating anecdotes,” said Pia Libicka-Regulska, the Consul of Poland. “We have selected 24 inspiring persons and 15 initiatives to present on the website, but the plan is for it to be an ever-growing project, with new names added in the coming month and years,” she said.

For the project, the Embassy cooperated with many prominent Luxembourgers. The video features, among others, the CEO of Lux-Airport René Steinhaus; Claude Bertemes, the director of the Cinémathèque Luxembourg; and Cardinal Jean-Claude Hollerich, the archbishop of Luxembourg. The clip unveils some little known ties between the countries. It showcases, for instance, a Polish dancer who established the first ballet school in Luxembourg or a Luxembourg soldier forced into the German army who deserted to help the Polish Resistance. It also tells the story of a contemporary Polish artist living in Luxembourg whose sculptures are scattered around the country, including at the Lorentzweiler town hall entrance.

“The video and website present some fascinating stories; I am sure anyone who watches or reads it will get inspired,” the Consul said. “The anecdotes should interest not only those interested in the Polish culture but anyone who wants to learn about the people who might be their neighbours or colleagues,” she said.

A dance gala concert and photographic exhibition will complete the centenary celebrations, with the dates of the events to be announced later in the year when the sanitary situation stabilises.

“I have worked and lived in several countries, and I can say with all certainty the Grand Duchy is among the most welcoming ones,” the Ambassador said. “That’s why so many Polish people have settled here and we are now proudly sharing their stories,” he said.