The new measures, which will be effective as of the beginning of May, aim at improving the security of pedestrians and cyclists on Luxembourg's roads.

Protecting pedestrians and cyclists has become a priority in Luxembourg. In order to achieve this goal, the Grand Duchy has looked at best practices in Germany, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Denmark, Austria, Spain and Switzerland, among others and is aligning its practices.

The nine measures in a nutshell:

  • 1. Introduction of continued sidewalks at intersections, as can be found in neighbouring countries. The lack of interruption of sidewalks at intersections is meant to prioritise pedestrians over vehicles. The design provides a more direct and visible alternative to current traditional pedestrian crossings. 
         

    [block type="attachment" id="53000894" __caption="Trottoirs traversants"]

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 3. Cyclists will be officially permitted to cycle side by side (two bikes at most). This should make overtaking cyclists easier for cars - as it shortens the distance to be covered when overtaking a group of cyclists, all while making cycling a more "sociable" activity. There are some exceptions though, which are prone to interpretation: riding side by side should be avoided if it "hampers unnecessarily traffic", or in "dangerous situations". The third exception is quite clear; at night, cyclists will have to ride in single file.

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 4. New signs indicating cycling infrastructure that can, but doesn't have to be taken by cyclists. There will be no obligation to use cycling infrastructure for sports cyclists, who prefer to train on regular roads. The aim is to reduce the number of accidents by cyclists colliding with either pedestrians or with other cyclists riding at a different speed. 

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 5. New orange flashing traffic lights will allow cyclists to continue their ride even when lights turn red for motorised vehicles. The measure aims at making cycling more attractive by reducing the number of times cyclists need to stop. It is underlined that the practical implementation of the measure will be determined through a pilot project involving all stakeholders.

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 6. Children up to 12 years of age will be allowed to cycle on sidewalks (the new regulation extends the previous maximum age of 10) and can be accompanied by an older person. The aim here is to foster (safe) bike riding among children, most notably on their way to school.  

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 7. "Bike roads" as a new alternative to "bike lanes". The new cycling roads will give cycling priority in urban areas. On such roads, passing cyclists won't be allowed. Access will be limited to residents. The maximum speed on this lane is set at 30 km/h. 

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 8. New signs to signal dead ends for cars which can be traversed by pedestrians and cyclists. This will provide and easy and intuitive way to know when there's a way out of a dead end if you're not driving.

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg

    • 9. Yellow bands on the fenders of bikes will no longer be mandatory. The list of other devices which are currently mandatory remains however unchanged: a bell: two brakes; a light (yellow or white) at the front; two reflectors per wheel; reflectors on the pedals; a red reflector (#7 on the picture below); and a red tail light.

    © Gouvernement du Grand-Duché de Luxembourg