This year’s Global Talent Competitiveness Index (GTCI), which includes 132 countries, focuses on AI and talent competitiveness.

Adapting to this new way of working is important for countries to grow their economies and stay globally competitive.

The top 10 countries in this year’s rankings are high-income economies that perform well across both the input (i.e. market landscape, education) and output (i.e. employability, talent impact) pillars of the GTCI model.

"Luxembourg (8) scores well in innovation and entrepreneurialism but needs improvement in formal education."

The Grand Duchy gains ground this year up to 8th from last year's 10th with an overall score of 73.94.

Switzerland (1) remains the leader across the input and output pillars, although it doesn’t score as well in terms of gender equality or tolerance of minorities. Sweden (4) continues to perform well in the rankings, especially in terms of both regulatory and market landscapes. Denmark (5) is a leader in retaining talent. Vocational and technical skills help both the Netherlands (6) and Finland (7) into the top 10. Luxembourg (8) scores well in innovation and entrepreneurialism but needs improvement in formal education. The last of the Nordics, Norway (9), is a leader in retaining home-grown talent. (Source: https://gtcistudy.com/)

In comparison to neighbouring Germany (11) and France (21) Luxembourg has boosted it's global reach in the talent pools. Perhaps in someway explaining the influx of cross-border workers and nationalities flocking to the country.